The College held this year’s Educational Forums for members in Sudbury, October 19, 2017 and Kitchener, October 26, 2017.

Sudbury

Date: Thursday, October 19, 2017
Time: 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: Radisson Sudbury Hotel
  85 Ste. Anne Road
  Sudbury, ON P3E 4S4

Kitchener

Date: Thursday, October 26, 2017
Time: 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: Holiday Inn Kitchener
  30 Fairway Road South
  Kitchener, ON N2A 2N2

Agenda

12:00 – 1:15 p.m. Lunch/Networking
1:15 – 1:45 p.m. OCSWSSW Update
1:45 – 2:00 p.m. Break
2:00 – 3:30 p.m. Keynote Address and Q&A
3:30  – 4:00 p.m. Wrap-up

Agenda

12:00 – 1:15 p.m. Lunch/Networking
1:15 – 1:45 p.m. OCSWSSW Update
1:45 – 2:00 p.m. Break
2:00 – 3:30 p.m. Keynote Address and Q&A
3:30 – 4:00 p.m. Wrap-up

Keynote Speaker – Steven Solomon, MSW, PhD, RSW

“As Common as Saying Hello” – Middle School Students’ Perceptions of Homophobic Language – What I know so far…

At school, students’ experiences with name-calling, put-downs, and teasing figure prominently. The student census of a large urban school board in Canada reported forty-one per cent of grade seven and eight students experienced name-calling or insults. Thus, it is important for social workers and social service workers to recognize that anti-gay language exists in middle schools and other locales, affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, Two-spirit (LGBTQ2S) and straight-identified students alike. Based on the presenter’s qualitative research linked to school social work practice addressing anti-homophobia, this workshop explores the prevalence of homophobic name calling in middle schools and its interlocking relationship to sexist language. While drawing on focus group research with middle school students, this workshop will offer insights and strategies for addressing anti-gay language among children and youth, for social workers and social service workers alike in varied settings.

To access the PowerPoint presentation in PDF format click here.

Keynote Speaker – David Burnes, MSW, PhD, RSW

Elder Mistreatment: What Does It Mean? How Should I Respond To It?

Elder mistreatment is a pervasive public health and societal problem with serious consequences. Although the scope of elder mistreatment is growing with the population of older adults, many professionals remain unclear about what constitutes elder mistreatment or how to respond to this problem in the community. This presentation will provide current knowledge about elder mistreatment, including an understanding of its meaning, prevalence, and risk factors. With fundamental principles of older adult self-determination and voluntariness in mind, this talk will also present a conceptual practice model to help social workers and social service workers think about how to assist victims of elder mistreatment. They will be asked to share their clinical insight and experience in dealing with cases of elder mistreatment within a fragmented and uncoordinated community response system.

To access the PowerPoint presentation in PDF format click here.